Friday, January 24, 2020

Fontanilla to retire

Received today:
Dear IVC community, 
Retreating residuum
     Last week I was informed by Dr. Linda Fontanilla [Vice President for Student Services] about her intent to retire from Irvine Valley College effective May 11, 2020. I am sending this announcement to be the very first to extend my personal gratitude, and that of the IVC Family to Dr. Fontanilla for her many years of dedication and commitment to IVC and to our students.
. . . .
     Now, on the brink of retirement, it is time for Linda to pursue the enrichment of her own life just as she has enriched countless other lives. We here at IVC and across the South Orange County Community College District have learned much from Linda’s modeling on campus through her strong work ethic and a passion for service. She will be greatly missed.
     Please join me in thanking Linda and wishing her the very best in her retirement.
Best regards,

Cindy Vyskocil, Ed.D.
Acting President
Irvine Valley College



11 comments:

Anonymous said...

The breath of fresh air keeps blowing.

Anonymous said...

https://youtu.be/ZbZSe6N_BXs

Anonymous said...

Let us have a s t r o n g faculty presence on the administrative hiring committees.

Anonymous said...

Assertive and informed faculty wanted for 7:40s request.

Anonymous said...

Now if Saddleback can just get rid of Juan....

Anonymous said...

The timing of her retirement is interesting seeing that her Sr. Admin was walked off campus less than a month ago and let's see if this upstanding administrator is going to get lifetime benefits despite not making it the full 10 years.... Sadly, selling out your vocal classified staff pays well in this district.

Anonymous said...

9:29 - This is the first I have heard of this, perhaps because of the start of the semester and all the holidays, etc. Who was Linda's Sr. Admin? What is the Classified Senate doing? or the union?

Anonymous said...

I have heard that Dean's will be assessed. There are a few lame ducks who do not work for their departments. Any news on how this will roll out and if it will assess dean service to their departments, or be a purely self serving device demonstrating how servile they are to the boss of the moment?

Anonymous said...

I think this is a period of genuine change at the college and district level. Of course at IVC it will take a while to dismantle the culture to abject obedience to one man's reductive and self-serving vision of higher ed, but I am hopeful. I have been disappointed through the years of how people simply agreed to what they knew was wrong or not the best just because to object would, they imagined, put their jobs at risk. Of course, some of that fear was justified. We have seen many good people let go for no good reason just as we have seen incompetent people tolerated and protected. I am disappointed in how the board just let that happen through the years without questioning why. Disgraceful. I am heartened by the leadership of the new chancellor.

Anonymous said...

Was the dismissed employee Maria Nunez who was recognized in 2017 "for going above and beyond" in helping with accreditation?

http://marketing.ivc.edu/news/archive/2017/08/16/president%E2%80%99s-awards-recipients-honored.aspx

Anonymous said...

6:09, yes.

8-14: do you regret all the lying?

✅ Trump Encourages Racist Conspiracy Theory on Kamala Harris’s Eligibility to Be Vice President NYT ✅ Orange County Sees Overall Coronavirus...

Goals and Values and Twaddle

blather: long-winded talk with no real substance*
The whole concept of MSLOs [measurable student learning outcomes] as the latest fad in education is somewhat akin to the now discredited fad of the '90's, Total Quality Management, or TQM. Essentially, the ACCJC adopted MSLOs as the overarching basis for accrediting community colleges based on their faith in the theoretical treatises of a movement.... After repeated requests for research showing that such use of MSLOs is effective, none has been forthcoming from the ACCJC [accreditors]. Prior to large scale imposition of such a requirement at all institutions, research should be provided to establish that continuous monitoring of MSLOs has resulted in measurable improvements in student success at a given institution. No such research is forthcoming because there is none….
The Accountability Game…., Leon F. Marzillier (Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, October, 2002)
In the summer of ’13, I offered a critique of the awkward verbiage by which the district and colleges explain their values, goals, and objectives —aka SOCCCD'S G&V (goals and values) blather.
I wrote a post each for the district, Saddleback College, and Irvine Valley College efforts. (See the links below.)
This verbiage—stated in terms of “values,” “missions,” “goals,” “visions,” and whatnot—is often badly written. It is sometimes embarrassingly trite.
It occasionally communicates something worthwhile.
No doubt you are familiar with the usual objections to jargon. Higher education, too, has its jargon—an irony, given typical college-level instruction in writing, which urges jargon eschewery.
Sure enough, SOCCCD G&V blather is riddled with jargon and with terms misused and abused. For instance, in the case of the district’s dubious blather, the so-called “vision” is actually a purpose. Why didn't they just call it that?
As one slogs through this prattle, one finds that "visions" tend to be awfully similar to “missions,” with which they are distinguished. The latter in turn are awfully similar to “goals,” which must be distinguished from “objectives.” But aren't goals and objectives pretty much the same thing?
These perverse word games will surely perplex or annoy anyone armed with a command of the English language. In fact, readers will be perplexed to the degree that they are thus armed. Illiterates, of course, will be untroubled.
Here's a simple point: the district and colleges’ G&V blather tends to eschew good, plain English in favor of technical terms and trendy words and phrases (i.e., it tends to be bullshitty and vague). Thus, one encounters such trendy terminological turds as “dynamic,” “diversity,” “student success,” and “student-centered.” Even meretricious neologisms such as ISLOs and “persistence rates” pop up, unexplained, undefended.
Does anyone see a transparency problem with all of this? Shouldn't the public, or at least the well educated public, be able to comprehend statements of the colleges' goals and values?
In the case of the district, to its credit, all it really seems to want to say is that it wants to teach well and it wants students to succeed. Admirable!
So why all the ugly, common-sense defying, buzzword-encrusted claptrap?

Districtular poppycock: our “vision” and our “mission” and our tolerance of twaddle - July 31, 2013

THEY BUZZ: Saddleback College's "Mission, Vision, and Values" - August 4, 2013

IVC’s vision, mission, and goals: nonsense on stilts - August 5, 2013

THE IRVINE VALLEY CHRONICLES: no ideas, just clichés & buzzwords - Sep 30, 2013

*From my Apple laptop's dictionary