Wednesday, September 20, 2017

California Guided Pathways Wankery

Institutional Effectiveness Toss Off
Colleagues,

The first California Guided Pathways Project (CGPP) Institute was held this week in Costa Mesa. I had the pleasure of joining my AACC colleagues, Aspen Institute leaders, and the Bakersfield and Mt. San Antonio College presidents in making a presentation on our national AACC Guided Pathways Project experience. 20 California colleges were chosen to participate in the first round of CGPP Institutes. Out of the 20 colleges, a few have already done much of the work of setting Meta-majors (or a term of their own liking), and mapping courses leading to the Meta-majors. Mt. SAC (AACC National Guided Pathways Project College), has completed this process for over 70 programs and is moving to implementation. Other colleges are at the very beginning and are highly engaged in the process and the opportunity to increase student completion. CGPP will also go a long way toward supporting our underrepresented students that are often challenged by our existing system of application, matriculation, academic planning, enrollment, and the pathway to completion.

California Guided Pathways Project
In addition to the AACC National Guided Pathways Project and now the CGPP, the State Chancellor Office has established its own Guided Pathways Grant that will be administered by the Institutional Effectiveness Partnership Initiative (IEPI). The grant has been funded by the legislature up to $150M. It is anticipated that continued funding for SSSP, SEP, and Basic Skills, will be determined on a direct and measurable connection to the IEPI Guided Pathways under a performance-base model.

Oo! It's big and shiny!
I hope you will participate when the Pathways Pioneers come to your School or Department for an in-depth dialog regarding Guided Pathways.

Very Respectfully,

Glenn R. Roquemore, PhD
President
Irvine Valley College
     The California Guided Pathways Project will help 20 California community colleges implement an integrated, institution-wide approach to student success by creating structured educational experiences that support each student from point of entry to attainment of high-quality postsecondary credentials and careers. 
     Excuse me while I switch hands 
Glenn ♡  Donald

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Every ten years it's something new that aims to streamline the education process like it's the worst kind of assembly line.

Faculty are pushing back at similar proposals at CSU:

https://edsource.org/2017/csu-faculty-rebel-against-changes-in-remedial-and-math-education-calls-for-delay/587650

Anonymous said...

And every ten years we panic about low enrollment. Vice presidents who have no idea what they're doing make threats, point fingers, and hold on for dear life to efforts like this one. Then lo and behold, the economy slows down, we get more students than we know what to do with, and plans like this one are abandoned.

Anonymous said...

If the IVC president it behind it, best head for the bunkers.

Anonymous said...

The pressure to "increase student completion" (god, I hate these terms) often does not take into consideration the level of competency at which students arrive in our classes nor the real world pressures that take them away from their studies while they are here. We should also be discussing K-12 education deficits, meeting the language needs of our international and immigrant student populations, raising the minimum wage, lowering housing costs and reducing students tuition costs - as well as hiring more full-time faculty to teach them.

I often think plans like this are designed to make the planners and the plan implement-tors look good at the expense of students who deserve yes, to graduate, but also really often need more time not only to develop real skills that will last but also acquire an education.