Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Rebel Girl's Poetry Corner: "what world is this that makes our lives sufficient even as the horizon’s rope is about to snap"


     Khaled Mattawa 's book, Amorisco, features a long poem, “East of Carthage: An Idyll.”  Mattawa was born in Libya and has spent much of his adult life living in the United States.
     Here's the opening.

EAST OF CARTHAGE: AN IDYLL
1.
Look here, Marcus Aurelius, we’ve come to see
your temple, deluded the guards, crawled through a hole
in the fence. Why your descendent, my guide and friend
has opted for secrecy, I don’t know. But I do know
what to call the Africans, passport-less, yellow-eyed
who will ride the boat before me for Naples, they hope.
Here the sea curls its granite lip at them and flings a winter
storm like a cough, or the seadog drops them at Hannibal’s
shores, where they’ll stand stupefied like his elephants.
What dimension of time will they cross as the Hours loop
tight plastic ropes round their ankles and wrists?
What siren song will the trucks shipping them back
to Ouagadougou drone into their ears? I look at them
loitering, waiting for the second act of their darkness
to fall. I look at the sky shake her dicey fists.
One can be thankful, I suppose, for not being one of them,
and wrap the fabric of that thought around oneself
to keep the cold wind at bay. But what world is this
that makes our lives sufficient even as the horizon’s rope
is about to snap, while the sea and sky ache to become
a moment to peel itself like skin off fruit, and let us in
on its sweetness as we wait, smoking or fondling provisions,
listening to the engine’s invocational purr. In an hour
that will dawn and dusk at once, one that will stretch
into days strung like beads on the horizon’s throat,
they will ride their tormented ship as the dog star
begins to float on the water, so bright and still,
you’d want to scoop it out in the palm of your hand.

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( This poem - and this poet - was brought to Rebel Girl's attention by Forest Gander in his essay post, "Libya: Don't Look Away." Photo of Medusa Head by Forrest Gander.)

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3 comments:

  1. Two fine poems in a row. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What an incredibly poignant phrase you highlighted in the title... Beautiful.

    ReplyDelete

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